Caring for Stranded Marine Animals
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Patient Update October 26th

Seals:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jones

Jones is doing well without any significant health changes. All three of our current harbor seal patients have reached release weight, but due to the Pinniped Unusual Mortality Event, we have had to hold on to these three individuals for longer than is typical. With cases indicative of Phocine Distemper Virus appearing in Rhode Island, the UME is spreading and we will await word from the proper authorities about a new course of action regarding the release of these animals. In the meantime, Jones will continue to stay in one of our larger tanks, where he really enjoys our simulated kelp forest!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sugar

Sugar is doing very well and has recovered from her minor surgery very nicely. Her eye is much clearer and we believe this procedure helped to prevent further damage to her eye. The opacity in her eye has decreased immensely and she seems to be very happy in the large tank alongside Bear and Jones. She will continue to reside here until we determine our next course of action pertaining release of these animals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bear

Over the past week or so, Bear has been squinting her eye and sneezing far more frequently. As a result of potentially having to hold these animals for even longer, our animal care staff is contemplating performing a procedure similar to that of the one that was performed on Sugar earlier this year. Additionally, her ear infection appears to still be causing her discomfort, so we will continue to watch for symptoms that may require our intervention.

 

Turtles:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Etta

Etta received surgery on her left front flipper at New England Aquarium on Thursday, October 25th, in order to prevent further spread of the osteolytic lesion in her shoulder, and restore mobility to her flipper. Our veterinarian was able to remove a large chunk of necrotic tissue, which is great compared to having to remove numerous fragmented pieces. We will monitor her very closely over the next few days in our isolation pool to determine her range of motion and behavior following this procedure.

 

Posted by Grant M.

Grant is a second semester intern who recently graduated from Roger Williams University with degrees in Biology and Chemistry.

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