Caring for Stranded Marine Animals
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Learning science…. You can help inspire youth!

Do you remember first learning about science? What was your experience like? Did you love it?

Science. Technology. Engineering. Math. These “STEM” skills are important, both for individual success and community sustainability. And yet, we are falling short. Far too many young people say they “don’t like” science or “can’t do” math.

We even hear this from students participating in education programs at the National Marine Life Center. And yet, when questioned why they’re here, they say with great excitement that they just love animals!

You can help more children develop STEM skills as they learn about marine animals. Donate now.

NMLC’s education programs use topics of marine animals, strandings, and rehabilitation to teach STEM concepts. We’ve found – and scientific articles back this up – that when students are learning about animals, they become more engaged in the science. They see new applications for technology. They see the real- life purpose behind engineering and math. And suddenly it’s not so hard.

And that’s just the beginning. Students learning and caring about marine animals also learn to protect the ocean ecosystem in which they live. Students understand that both animals and people depend on a healthy environment. And students are inspired to take positive action.

You can inspire the next generation to learn and care about science and about the environment. There’s still time to make a year-end, tax deductible gift to the National Marine Life Center. Please, donate now.

On behalf of the kids in our education programs, thank you.

One Comment

  1. I was recently in Las Vegas at Caesar’s Palace, and saw a ray trying to move through the water between the glass wall and the artificial ocean landscape behind. There was not enough room for the ray to move without it’s fins hitting one, or both, of the sides of the aquarium I described. I couldn’t watch. It was horrible. Is there anything you can do to rescue this animal?
    Thank you.
    Sincerely,
    Amy Gustafson

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